LEARNINGS
Research results and user testing from numerous samples are useful to identify significant consumer annoyances and failures in the product acceptability, as other variables that might become evident as the product becomes familiar to the consumer. However, research results from small samples are precious, particularly at its early stages.

Esthetics and simplicity should not be competing forces within a design project. Excellent user experience should be the leading factor in the design process. Users will fall in love with functionality, but beauty will only daze them momentarily. Esthetics should be at the service of functionality.

UX designers should focus on what users need rather than what users want. These two concepts are not always in agreement. However, users always respond positively to the right solutions. Because excellent solutions met their targeted needs and the ones they had not yet identified.

Iteration is a vital component of User-Centered Design. A final product is always provisory.
MVP
High Fidelity Prototype
Lastly, I created a High-fidelity (hi-fi) prototype that looked close to what the final product should look like that included basic features. The prototype does not include features such as the "extra features" section. However, that section of the app could be tested independently, since it had been decided that the user might choose to access that section when he/she enters the app. This MVP would allow us to:



• Move gradually but safely able to iron out problems and gain feedback for future iterations.

• Experimenting without highly cost "precious" prototypes.

• Be able to abandon ideas that, in the end, did not work as expected.
Image
Image
Image
Clicable wireframe Basic Prototype
Before creating a real product, it is fundamental to test the interaction design thoroughly. During the low-risk research phase and before public release, it is crucial to collect feedback. It will save us time, money, and guarantee a higher level of success.

At this time, we were looking to confirm the changes implemented improved the usability issues and discover if any areas needed further improvement.
Image
Image
Recommendations
Image
Based on the test findings I recommend the following changes:

• I recommend replacing the application name button with a Home button - icon, text, or both - to avoid confusion about how to return to the starting page or “home page.”

• I suggest adding a More Options button at the bottom of the New Reminder screen for participants to access additional options from te beginning.

• Some users would appreciate the addition of voice to text without interfering negatively with the simplicity of the design.
Recommendations
Image Image
Image
Test Findings
Image
The following findings emerged from the research:

• Reminder X design priorities were met. All participants found the Reminder X design to be from easy to very easy through all scenarios from 1 to 6.

• All participants regarded the design’s navigation to be simple enough to validate the solution offered.

• All participants felt they understood each path enough to go back and performed it again without further effort revealing the app was easy to learn.

Design problems:

• The Reminder x button that takes the users back to the very first opening screen named Reminder x was not clear to all but one participant. A couple of participants expected to see a home button.

• The New Reminder screen needs a More Options button. This particular issue highlighted a design problem. The button was missing and interfered with the flow of one of the scenarios. A couple of users would have liked to create a more customized reminder from the beginning of the process.

Potential unidentified variables:

All participants found the first screen to be from inviting to very inviting. However, since I did not use colors but only black and white (paper), this particular feedback could not be considered reliable.
Test Findings
Image Image
PROTOTYPING AND USABILITY TESTING
Low-fidelity paper prototypes are a perfect option to evaluate the first stage of the design and the general structure of the application. It allows for quick adjustments without requiring costly digital implementation.

With this purpose, I created a usability testing plan presentation that included the testing goals, participants, test modality and methodology, scenarios, schedule, and results.
Participants were presented with a set of paper screens to manipulate, write on, and move around. The participant would navigate every scenario from screen 1 through all the screens necessary and back again to the beginning. Each participant had a clean set, each allowing them to make notes directly on the papers with suggestions or modifications they might have offered. Each interview lasted between 25 and 45 minutes.
Image
Usability Testing Using Paper Screens
At this exciting stage of the process, we work to generate ideas on how to meet the established requirements most creatively. At this point, we prioritize quantity rather than quality. We evaluate every possibility from a pool of varied options, free of judgment. This way, we increase our chances of arriving at high-quality design solutions.

I created several visual representations (flowcharts, wire flows, and other roughs) to communicate the user's journey. This kind of material is ideal for critiquing, iterating, and improving the design
IDEATION
Image Image Image Image Image
Display of a few roughs from the first set of wireframes.
Image Image
This is the starting screen from where the user can go to settings to customize the app or go ahead and create a new reminder.
This wireflow illustrates in more detail the paths from beginning (A) to end (C or D). From both, C and D, the user saves the reminder and ends on screen E..
Image
The settings offer two simple options. A reminder with sound, or without sound (only an image reminder), and with or without snooze. This setting will rule for all the future reminders created, unless options are changed at screen D, if the user decides to add more options.
Image Image
The settings offer two simple options. A reminder with sound, or without sound (only an image reminder), and with or without snooze. This setting will rule for all the future reminders created, unless options are changed at screen D, if the user decides to add more options.
Image Image
Image
This wireflow illustrates the two previously explained paths that the user can transit to create a reminder or a to-do action. One starts on screen A and ends on C, the other one continues to screen D.
Image Image
The app’s process simplified. It can be divide in two cycles, Basic Options  and More Options.
Samples of Some of the Visual Representations Used Throughout the Ideation Stage.
Image
Image Image Image
Image Image Image
Image
Design Features
Based on our research, the design should follow the following principles:

1. Clean, and simple interface.
2. Easy to use (As easy as Outlook or easier).
3. Easy to learn.
4. Share the Outlook mental model.
5. Able to create quick simple notes and reminders (just title and
time/hour).
6. Able to create more in depth detailed reminders.
7. It should resemble the experience of making paper notes.
Design Principles
Design Features
1. Simple Design: Users will be able to create quick notifications without having to spend much time navigating the application or typing.
2. Customizable: Users can save reminders by category.
3. Easy to learn.
4. Other Features: At times, and depending on the particular occasion and need, the user would choose to create a more specific reminder. Then, he could add other options, such as: add notes, attach notes, invite/ share, sound, snooze, and alerts (minutes or hours, before and after).5. Able to create quick simple notes and reminders (just title and time/hour).

NOTE: These additional features should not involve complicated or time-consuming navigation paths.
At this stage in the process, we take the finding from the discovery phase and evaluate what is necessary to design the right strategy for the best user experience possible..
DEFINITION
Image
Persona
Image Image Image Image Image Image
Visual representations about the user's behavior and habits are very supportive and clarifying to extend ideas that people get from other sources of information such as text. They help the observer to imagine situations. People perceive images quicker than words and stick better in long-term memory. Then, it is useful to have these kinds of models available to the developing team for reference as we work to design solutions for our users.
Depicting the User’s Lifestyle and Habits
Image
Research Findings
• Most users acknowledge the need to remember schedules more effectively.
• Users have demanding schedules, mostly work-related. Half of them have been using   Outlook for several years.
• All users assist th emselves using paper notes.  
• Users have different preferences when it comes to the time frame when they need to be alerted.
• Half of the participants are not comfortable making changes and prefer simple tools.
• All participants would benefit from alerts about social events such as birthdays, and anniversaries.
• Half of the participants will benefit from reminders that would include extra features such as meeting’s details and other notes and information.
Research Design
POPULATION: Working adults.
SAMPLE SIZE: 4 people (2 women and 2 men).
PARTICIPANT’S AGE RANGE: 35-57
STUDY DESIGN: Interviews (15 to 20 minutes. 20 questions)
Image
Research Questionnaire
Image Image
1-What do you do for living and what other activities you perform regularly?
2-What is your highest level of education?
3-How productive do you consider to be yourself?
4-How busy or difficult is your schedule?
5-Does your schedule look similar every day or week of the month?
6-How good are you at following it?
7-How does it make you feel?
8-Do you have other appointments or to-do activities to remember every month, year that are not part of your regular schedule?
9-How often do you forget about any of these - daily, weekly, monthly or yearly - events or activities?
10-How important is for you to remember your schedule? Is forgetting about any of its items highly negatively consequential?
11-Which ones do you forget the most?
12-Which ones must you remember no matter what?
13-Which of any of the events that you ever forgot do you regret the most?
14-What strategies do you use to remember your schedule or any other to-do, calendar events or other activities you need to remember?
15-If you could choose, what would you prefer, having a person or a device to remind you about events you need to remember?
16-How would that person or device behave? How would it contact or communicate with you?
17-How often would you need to be reminded about items that you need to remember? How far before?
18-Does social media play any role on your schedule and your need to remember events related to it?
19-Are there any events that you would consider important not only to remember but to let others know that you remember them, or remind of them to others?
20-How would having help to remember all your schedules and dates affect your life in general?
Research Questionnaire
Research
Image
To empathize with the different types of users, we first need to develop proto-personas. We base them on mere assumptions rather than proven facts. Proto-personas are our starting point to discover the real needs and challenges of our users. However, in order to validate our assumptions, we will have to do research.
Proto-Persona
We need to empathize with the users to understand him or her sincerely. We need to comprehend their motivations and needs. Acknowledging them is not enough. We need to move beyond their frustrations to reach their expectations, hopes, and goals. This understanding is fundamental to create solutions that would improve the user's lives. To move beyond our assumptions, we must dig ourselves into research.
EMPATHIZE
Image
Empathize
Analyse
Prototype/test
Ideate
Define
Design Process
Image
Four weeks from Project kickoff to the documentation of the findings.
Project Time
Image
Research, UX/UI design.
My Role
Image
The challenge of this project was to create an application that would be more than a generic to-do list or reminder app. It should be a simple scheduler to help people organize their daily life duties and work tasks.
The Challenge
Image
Image
UX/UI/Projects > Remind Me
Image
LEARNINGS
Research results and user testing from numerous samples are useful to identify significant consumer annoyances and failures in the product acceptability, as other variables that might become evident as the product becomes familiar to the consumer. However, research results from small samples are precious, particularly at its early stages.

Esthetics and simplicity should not be competing forces within a design project. Excellent user experience should be the leading factor in the design process. Users will fall in love with functionality, but beauty will only daze them momentarily. Esthetics should be at the service of functionality.

UX designers should focus on what users need rather than what users want. These two concepts are not always in agreement. However, users always respond positively to the right solutions. Because excellent solutions met their targeted needs and the ones they had not yet identified.

Iteration is a vital component of User-Centered Design. A final product is always provisory.
MVP
High Fidelity Prototype
Lastly, I created a High-fidelity (hi-fi) prototype that looked close to what the final product should look like that included basic features. The prototype does not include features such as the "extra features" section. However, that section of the app could be tested independently, since it had been decided that the user might choose to access that section when he/she enters the app. This MVP would allow us to:



• Move gradually but safely able to iron out problems and gain feedback for future iterations.

• Experimenting without highly cost "precious" prototypes.

• Be able to abandon ideas that, in the end, did not work as expected.
Image
Image
Image
Clicable wireframe Basic Prototype
Before creating a real product, it is fundamental to test the interaction design thoroughly. During the low-risk research phase and before public release, it is crucial to collect feedback. It will save us time, money, and guarantee a higher level of success.

At this time, we were looking to confirm the changes implemented improved the usability issues and discover if any areas needed further improvement.
Image
Image
Recommendations
Image
Based on the test findings I recommend the following changes:

• I recommend replacing the application name button with a Home button - icon, text, or both - to avoid confusion about how to return to the starting page or “home page.”

• I suggest adding a More Options button at the bottom of the New Reminder screen for participants to access additional options from te beginning.

• Some users would appreciate the addition of voice to text without interfering negatively with the simplicity of the design.
Recommendations
Image Image
Image
Test Findings
Image
The following findings emerged from the research:

• Reminder X design priorities were met. All participants found the Reminder X design to be from easy to very easy through all scenarios from 1 to 6.

• All participants regarded the design’s navigation to be simple enough to validate the solution offered.

• All participants felt they understood each path enough to go back and performed it again without further effort revealing the app was easy to learn.

Design problems:

• The Reminder x button that takes the users back to the very first opening screen named Reminder x was not clear to all but one participant. A couple of participants expected to see a home button.

• The New Reminder screen needs a More Options button. This particular issue highlighted a design problem. The button was missing and interfered with the flow of one of the scenarios. A couple of users would have liked to create a more customized reminder from the beginning of the process.

Potential unidentified variables:

All participants found the first screen to be from inviting to very inviting. However, since I did not use colors but only black and white (paper), this particular feedback could not be considered reliable.
Test Findings
Image Image
PROTOTYPING AND USABILITY TESTING
Low-fidelity paper prototypes are a perfect option to evaluate the first stage of the design and the general structure of the application. It allows for quick adjustments without requiring costly digital implementation.

With this purpose, I created a usability testing plan presentation that included the testing goals, participants, test modality and methodology, scenarios, schedule, and results.
Participants were presented with a set of paper screens to manipulate, write on, and move around. The participant would navigate every scenario from screen 1 through all the screens necessary and back again to the beginning. Each participant had a clean set, each allowing them to make notes directly on the papers with suggestions or modifications they might have offered. Each interview lasted between 25 and 45 minutes.
Image
Usability Testing Using Paper Screens
Design Features
Based on our research, the design should follow the following principles:

1. Clean, and simple interface.
2. Easy to use (As easy as Outlook or easier).
3. Easy to learn.
4. Share the Outlook mental model.
5. Able to create quick simple notes and reminders (just title and
time/hour).
6. Able to create more in depth detailed reminders.
7. It should resemble the experience of making paper notes.
Design Principles
At this exciting stage of the process, we work to generate ideas on how to meet the established requirements most creatively. At this point, we prioritize quantity rather than quality. We evaluate every possibility from a pool of varied options, free of judgment. This way, we increase our chances of arriving at high-quality design solutions.

I created several visual representations (flowcharts, wire flows, and other roughs) to communicate the user's journey. This kind of material is ideal for critiquing, iterating, and improving the design
IDEATION
Design Features
1. Simple Design: Users will be able to create quick notifications without having to spend much time navigating the application or typing.
2. Customizable: Users can save reminders by category.
3. Easy to learn.
4. Other Features: At times, and depending on the particular occasion and need, the user would choose to create a more specific reminder. Then, he could add other options, such as: add notes, attach notes, invite/ share, sound, snooze, and alerts (minutes or hours, before and after).5. Able to create quick simple notes and reminders (just title and time/hour).

NOTE: These additional features should not involve complicated or time-consuming navigation paths.
At this stage in the process, we take the finding from the discovery phase and evaluate what is necessary to design the right strategy for the best user experience possible..
DEFINITION
Image
Persona
Image Image Image Image Image Image
Image Image Image Image Image
Display of a few roughs from the first set of wireframes.
Image Image
This is the starting screen from where the user can go to settings to customize the app or go ahead and create a new reminder.
This wireflow illustrates in more detail the paths from beginning (A) to end (C or D). From both, C and D, the user saves the reminder and ends on screen E..
Image
The settings offer two simple options. A reminder with sound, or without sound (only an image reminder), and with or without snooze. This setting will rule for all the future reminders created, unless options are changed at screen D, if the user decides to add more options.
Image Image
The settings offer two simple options. A reminder with sound, or without sound (only an image reminder), and with or without snooze. This setting will rule for all the future reminders created, unless options are changed at screen D, if the user decides to add more options.
Image Image
Image
This wireflow illustrates the two previously explained paths that the user can transit to create a reminder or a to-do action. One starts on screen A and ends on C, the other one continues to screen D.
Image Image
The app’s process simplified. It can be divide in two cycles, Basic Options  and More Options.
Samples of Some of the Visual Representations Used Throughout the Ideation Stage.
Image
Image Image Image
Image Image Image
Image
Visual representations about the user's behavior and habits are very supportive and clarifying to extend ideas that people get from other sources of information such as text. They help the observer to imagine situations. People perceive images quicker than words and stick better in long-term memory. Then, it is useful to have these kinds of models available to the developing team for reference as we work to design solutions for our users.
Depicting the User’s Lifestyle and Habits
Image
Research Findings
• Most users acknowledge the need to remember schedules more effectively.
• Users have demanding schedules, mostly work-related. Half of them have been using   Outlook for several years.
• All users assist th emselves using paper notes.  
• Users have different preferences when it comes to the time frame when they need to be alerted.
• Half of the participants are not comfortable making changes and prefer simple tools.
• All participants would benefit from alerts about social events such as birthdays, and anniversaries.
• Half of the participants will benefit from reminders that would include extra features such as meeting’s details and other notes and information.
Research Design
POPULATION: Working adults.
SAMPLE SIZE: 4 people (2 women and 2 men).
PARTICIPANT’S AGE RANGE: 35-57
STUDY DESIGN: Interviews (15 to 20 minutes. 20 questions)
Image
Research Questionnaire
Image Image
1-What do you do for living and what other activities you perform regularly?
2-What is your highest level of education?
3-How productive do you consider to be yourself?
4-How busy or difficult is your schedule?
5-Does your schedule look similar every day or week of the month?
6-How good are you at following it?
7-How does it make you feel?
8-Do you have other appointments or to-do activities to remember every month, year that are not part of your regular schedule?
9-How often do you forget about any of these - daily, weekly, monthly or yearly - events or activities?
10-How important is for you to remember your schedule? Is forgetting about any of its items highly negatively consequential?
11-Which ones do you forget the most?
12-Which ones must you remember no matter what?
13-Which of any of the events that you ever forgot do you regret the most?
14-What strategies do you use to remember your schedule or any other to-do, calendar events or other activities you need to remember?
15-If you could choose, what would you prefer, having a person or a device to remind you about events you need to remember?
16-How would that person or device behave? How would it contact or communicate with you?
17-How often would you need to be reminded about items that you need to remember? How far before?
18-Does social media play any role on your schedule and your need to remember events related to it?
19-Are there any events that you would consider important not only to remember but to let others know that you remember them, or remind of them to others?
20-How would having help to remember all your schedules and dates affect your life in general?
Research Questionnaire
Research
Image
To empathize with the different types of users, we first need to develop proto-personas. We base them on mere assumptions rather than proven facts. Proto-personas are our starting point to discover the real needs and challenges of our users. However, in order to validate our assumptions, we will have to do research.
Proto-Persona
We need to empathize with the users to understand him or her sincerely. We need to comprehend their motivations and needs. Acknowledging them is not enough. We need to move beyond their frustrations to reach their expectations, hopes, and goals. This understanding is fundamental to create solutions that would improve the user's lives. To move beyond our assumptions, we must dig ourselves into research.
EMPATHIZE
Image
Empathize
Analyse
Prototype/test
Ideate
Define
Design Process
Image
Four weeks from Project kickoff to the documentation of the findings.
Project Time
Image
Research, UX/UI design.
My Role
Image
The challenge of this project was to create an application that would be more than a generic to-do list or reminder app. It should be a simple scheduler to help people organize their daily life duties and work tasks.
The Challenge
Image
Image
UX/UI/Projects > Remind Me
Image
The app’s process simplified. It can be divide in two cycles, Basic Options  and More Options.
Visual representations about the user's behavior and habits are very supportive and clarifying to extend ideas that people get from other sources of information such as text. They help the observer to imagine situations. People perceive images quicker than words and stick better in long-term memory. Then, it is useful to have these kinds of models available to the developing team for reference as we work to design solutions for our users.
Depicting the User’s Lifestyle and Habits
Image
Open Illustration pdf.
At this stage in the process, we take the finding from the discovery phase and evaluate what is necessary to design the right strategy for the best user experience possible..
DEFINITION
Based on our research, the design should follow the following principles:

1. Clean, and simple interface.
2. Easy to use (As easy as Outlook or easier).
3. Easy to learn.
4. Share the Outlook mental model.
5. Able to create quick simple notes and reminders (just title and
time/hour).
6. Able to create more in depth detailed reminders.
7. It should resemble the experience of making paper notes.
Design Principles
Design Features
1. Simple Design: Users will be able to create quick notifications without having to spend much time navigating the application or typing.
2. Customizable: Users can save reminders by category.
3. Easy to learn.
4. Other Features: At times, and depending on the particular occasion and need, the user would choose to create a more specific reminder. Then, he could add other options, such as: add notes, attach notes, invite/ share, sound, snooze, and alerts (minutes or hours, before and after).5. Able to create quick simple notes and reminders (just title and time/hour).

NOTE: These additional features should not involve complicated or time-consuming navigation paths.
At this exciting stage of the process, we work to generate ideas on how to meet the established requirements most creatively. At this point, we prioritize quantity rather than quality. We evaluate every possibility from a pool of varied options, free of judgment. This way, we increase our chances of arriving at high-quality design solutions.

I created several visual representations (flowcharts, wire flows, and other roughs) to communicate the user's journey. This kind of material is ideal for critiquing, iterating, and improving the design
IDEATION
Image
Open Flow pdf.
Image
This wireflow illustrates the two previously explained paths.
Open Wireflow pdf.
This wireflow illustrates in more detail the paths from beginning (A) to end (C or D). From both, C and D, the user saves the reminder and ends on screen E..
Image
This is the starting screen from where the user can go to settings to customize the app or go ahead and create a new reminder.
The settings offer two simple options. A reminder with sound, or without sound (only an image reminder), and with or without snooze. This setting will rule for all the future reminders created, unless options are changed at screen D, if the user decides to add more options.
The settings offer two simple options. A reminder with sound, or without sound (only an image reminder), and with or without snooze. This setting will rule for all the future reminders created, unless options are changed at screen D, if the user decides to add more options.
Image Image Image Image Image Image Image Image Image
VISUAL DESIGN
Image
Open Style Guide pdf.
Image Image Image Image Image
LEARNINGS
Research results and user testing from numerous samples are useful to identify significant consumer annoyances and failures in the product acceptability, as other variables that might become evident as the product becomes familiar to the consumer. However, research results from small samples are precious, particularly at its early stages.

Esthetics and simplicity should not be competing forces within a design project. Excellent user experience should be the leading factor in the design process. Users will fall in love with functionality, but beauty will only daze them momentarily. Esthetics should be at the service of functionality.

UX designers should focus on what users need rather than what users want. These two concepts are not always in agreement. However, users always respond positively to the right solutions. Because excellent solutions met their targeted needs and the ones they had not yet identified.

Iteration is a vital component of User-Centered Design. A final product is always provisory.
MVP
High Fidelity Prototype
Lastly, I created a High-fidelity (hi-fi) prototype that looked close to what the final product should look like that included basic features. The prototype does not include features such as the "extra features" section. However, that section of the app could be tested independently, since it had been decided that the user might choose to access that section when he/she enters the app. This MVP would allow us to:

• Move gradually but safely able to iron out problems and gain feedback for future iterations.

• Experimenting without highly cost "precious" prototypes.

• Be able to abandon ideas that, in the end, did not work as expected.
Image
PROTOTYPING AND USABILITY TESTING
Low-fidelity paper prototypes are a perfect option to evaluate the first stage of the design and the general structure of the application. It allows for quick adjustments without requiring costly digital implementation.

With this purpose, I created a usability testing plan presentation that included the testing goals, participants, test modality and methodology, scenarios, schedule, and results.
Participants were presented with a set of paper screens to manipulate, write on, and move around. The participant would navigate every scenario from screen 1 through all the screens necessary and back again to the beginning. Each participant had a clean set, each allowing them to make notes directly on the papers with suggestions or modifications they might have offered. Each interview lasted between 25 and 45 minutes.
Usability Testing Using Paper Screens
Clicable wireframe Basic Prototype
Before creating a real product, it is fundamental to test the interaction design thoroughly. During the low-risk research phase and before public release, it is crucial to collect feedback. It will save us time, money, and guarantee a higher level of success.

At this time, we were looking to confirm the changes implemented improved the usability issues and discover if any areas needed further improvement.
Image
Samples of Some of the Visual Representations Used Throughout the Ideation Stage.
Image
Open Wireframe Set pdf.
Image
Recommendations
Image
Based on the test findings I recommend the following changes:

• I recommend replacing the application name button with a Home button - icon, text, or both - to avoid confusion about how to return to the starting page or “home page.”

• I suggest adding a More Options button at the bottom of the New Reminder screen for participants to access additional options from te beginning.

• Some users would appreciate the addition of voice to text without interfering negatively with the simplicity of the design.
Image Image
Image
Test Findings
Image
The following findings emerged from the research:

• Reminder X design priorities were met. All participants found the Reminder X design to be from easy to very easy through all scenarios from 1 to 6.

• All participants regarded the design’s navigation to be simple enough to validate the solution offered.

• All participants felt they understood each path enough to go back and performed it again without further effort revealing the app was easy to learn.

Design problems:

• The Reminder x button that takes the users back to the very first opening screen named Reminder x was not clear to all but one participant. A couple of participants expected to see a home button.

• The New Reminder screen needs a More Options button. This particular issue highlighted a design problem. The button was missing and interfered with the flow of one of the scenarios. A couple of users would have liked to create a more customized reminder from the beginning of the process.

Potential unidentified variables:

All participants found the first screen to be from inviting to very inviting. However, since I did not use colors but only black and white (paper), this particular feedback could not be considered reliable.
Test Findings
Image Image
Research Findings
• Most users acknowledge the need to remember schedules more effectively.
• Users have demanding schedules, mostly work-related. Half of them have been using   Outlook for several years.
• All users assist th emselves using paper notes.  
• Users have different preferences when it comes to the time frame when they need to be alerted.
• Half of the participants are not comfortable making changes and prefer simple tools.
• All participants would benefit from alerts about social events such as birthdays, and anniversaries.
• Half of the participants will benefit from reminders that would include extra features such as meeting’s details and other notes and information.
Research Design
Research
POPULATION: Working adults.

SAMPLE SIZE: 4 people (2 women and 2 men).

PARTICIPANT’S AGE RANGE: 35-57

STUDY DESIGN: Interviews (15 to 20 minutes. 20 questions)
Image
Research Questionnaire
Image
1-What do you do for living and what other activities you perform regularly?
2-What is your highest level of education?
3-How productive do you consider to be yourself?
4-How busy or difficult is your schedule?
5-Does your schedule look similar every day or week of the month?
6-How good are you at following it?
7-How does it make you feel?
8-Do you have other appointments or to-do activities to remember every month, year that are not part of your regular schedule?
9-How often do you forget about any of these - daily, weekly, monthly or yearly - events or activities?
10-How important is for you to remember your schedule? Is forgetting about any of its items highly negatively consequential?
11-Which ones do you forget the most?
12-Which ones must you remember no matter what?
13-Which of any of the events that you ever forgot do you regret the most?
14-What strategies do you use to remember your schedule or any other to-do, calendar events or other activities you need to remember?
15-If you could choose, what would you prefer, having a person or a device to remind you about events you need to remember?
16-How would that person or device behave? How would it contact or communicate with you?
17-How often would you need to be reminded about items that you need to remember? How far before?
18-Does social media play any role on your schedule and your need to remember events related to it?
19-Are there any events that you would consider important not only to remember but to let others know that you remember them, or remind of them to others?
20-How would having help to remember all your schedules and dates affect your life in general?
Research Questionnaire
Image Image
Image
Open Persona pdf.
Persona
To empathize with the different types of users, we first need to develop proto-personas. We base them on mere assumptions rather than proven facts. Proto-personas are our starting point to discover the real needs and challenges of our users. However, in order to validate our assumptions, we will have to do research.
Proto-Persona
We need to empathize with the users to understand him or her sincerely. We need to comprehend their motivations and needs. Acknowledging them is not enough. We need to move beyond their frustrations to reach their expectations, hopes, and goals. This understanding is fundamental to create solutions that would improve the user's lives. To move beyond our assumptions, we must dig ourselves into research.
EMPATHIZE
• Empathize
• Define
• Ideate
• Prototype/test.
• Analyse
Design Process
Image
The challenge of this project was to create an application that would be more than a generic to-do list or reminder app. It should be a simple scheduler to help people organize their daily life duties and work tasks.
Image
The Challenge
My Role
Research, Information Architecture, Testing, UI design.
Image
Project Time
Four weeks from Project kickoff to the documentation of the findings.
Image
UX/UI/Projects > Remind Me